Naked Palette by Urban Decay – Review

 I know this palette is old news now, but with the recent buzz of Naked 3, I decided it would be interesting to take a look at where it all began.

For a lot of girls, eye shadow is one of the first make up products they will ever own. With the vast abundance of colours, textures and varieties of eye shadow available from drug store level to high end, it’s incredibly easy to get it very, very wrong. People often forget that there are a number of factors that can make eye shadow work amazingly, to lift, contour and sculpt the eye, or fail terribly, and create an over-done, trashy, dated look. For example, the skin tone, eye colour, and the age of the skin to name just a few. This is where Naked by Urban Decay helps you get it very, very right.

photo

photo 1 (1)

This palette contains 12 neutral shades and comes with the ‘Good Karma’ shadow brush as well as a small sample of  ‘Primer Potion’ to use beneath your eye shadow. Simply smear all over the lid before application for a more intense, long lasting, crease-proof look.

photo 2

The colours pictured above are Virgin, Sin, Naked, Sidecar, Buck, Half Baked, Smog, Darkhorse, Toasted, Hustle, Creep and Gunmetal. Each of these colours are extremely pigmented and glide over the eyelid without pulling and stretching the delicate skin. The palette contains three different textures; matte, shimmer and glitter.

photo 1 (2)

Virgin, Sin, Naked and Sidecar

  • Virgin (shimmer)  – This very pale pink is an amazing highlighter for the inner corner of the eye and the brow bone. There is a perfect amount of shimmer in this shade, so that it beautifully catches the light, opening the eye up and creating a dewy, wide-eyed effect.
  • Sin  (shimmer) – This shadow is a pale pink and would be best used for the front section of the lid if going for a girly, pink, romantic look, or to add a bit of drama to a subtle day time look. This colour also helps draw light into your eyes, making them pop.
  • Naked (matte) – This shadow is a light brown/beige colour that is perfect for adding dimension to your eye. Matte colours work amazingly as natural, subtle crease shadows. Naked would look the best on light to medium skin tones but can also be used as a blending shade for darker looks.
  • Sidecar (glitter) – This is a light mauve colour that goes really well with hustle if you’re looking to create an all over subtle purple look. This shadow is great to use all over the lid, and can be used alone as a daytime shade. The glitter is not too powerful, and creates a perfect amount of glamour, which could spruce up boring everyday looks.

photo 2 (2)

Buck, Half Baked, Smog and Darkhorse

  • Buck (matte) – This medium brown matte shade is great for creating a more dramatic crease on lighter skins, and is perfect for a natural subtle crease on darker skins. It can also be used for a natural day time look in the outer corner of the eye.
  • Half Baked (shimmer) – This is one of my favourite shadows in the whole palette. It’s a gorgeous golden bronze that particularly draws out blue eyes and makes them appear more blue. It creates amazing summer/beach looks if used all over the lid, and is great for the front section of the eye if you’re going for a bronze/brown smoky eye.
  • Smog (shimmer) – This is warm dark brown shade, perfect for crease work with a dark brown smoky eye. The subtle shimmer adds a lot more depth that the matte shades, due to the light reflecting from the glitter, which in turn helps create a more dramatic look.
  • Darkhorse (shimmer) – This cool dark brown shadow is amazing for the outer section of the eye. It can create dramatic looks, especially if you have a pale skin tone, without being as harsh as a black shade. It can also be used for lining the lower lash line.

photo 3

Toasted, Hustle, Creep and Gunmetal

  • Toasted (shimmer) – This dark pink shadow can swept all over the eye for a simple day time look, and can be used for the crease when creating girly, romantic looks
  • Hustle (shimmer) – This is a deep mauve colour that can create a dramatic look if used in the outer section of the lid. You can leave the line crisp and sharp (by cleaning it up with concealer) or blend it out to create a dreamy look. This colour can, again, be used if black is too harsh on your skin tone.
  • Creep (glitter) –  This is the darkest shade in the palette, and should be used when creating an original smoky eye. It’s a very deep pigmented black, that will create extremely dramatic looks if used in the outer section and left unblended. The glitter texture makes this shadow less versatile, though, it it’s as powerful as a matte black when used to line the lower lash line.
  • Gunmetal (glitter) –  This deep grey colour can be used all over the lid for a slightly more dramatic day time look, or the front section of the eye if creating a smoky eye. This colour will draw out brown/hazel eyes and will make them appear more brown and awake. It can also be used to create a dramatic crease, and blended out can create a gothic-chic look.

This palette is essential for make up beginners, and if you’re not sure whether to get Naked, Naked 2 or to wait for Naked 3, I can confidently say this is the place to start. It has colours needed to created a romantic look, a brown smoky eye, an original smoky eye, as well as many other looks, it’s versatile and can be used on every skin tone, skin age and eye colour, as there is a colour suitable for everyone. My only criticisms would be the lack off a matte black shade, needed to line the lower lash line, as well as a simple matte white, if a less harsh highlight is desired. I highly recommend this palette and can’t say enough good things about it! Although a little pricey, averaging at £37, it really is almost all the colours you would need to create daytime, as well as dramatic, looks. A must have! Available from Debenhams (UK) and here!

Thanks for reading!

– Em x

Advertisements

One thought on “Naked Palette by Urban Decay – Review

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s